Publications

Identifying Stakeholder Groups in Natural
Resource Management: Comparing Quantitative and Qualitative Social Network Approaches

Wutich, Beresford, Bausch, Eaton Brasier, Williams, Porter (2020) Identifying Stakeholder Groups in Natural Resource Management Comparing Quantitative and Qualitative Social Network Approaches

To cite this article: Amber Wutich, Melissa Beresford, Julia C. Bausch, Weston Eaton, Kathryn J. Brasier, Clinton F. Williams & Sarah Porter (2020): Identifying Stakeholder Groups in Natural Resource Management: Comparing Quantitative and Qualitative Social Network Approaches,

Society & Natural Resources, DOI: 10.1080/08941920.2019.1707922

To link to this article:  https://doi.org/10.1080/08941920.2019.1707922

Reid Alter Webinar Issue Brief

The Water for Agriculture Webinar Series welcomed Michael Reid and Dr. Ted Alter who shared lessons learned from the collaborative research and capacity-building partnership, the Victoria Rabbit Action Network (VRAN). A partnership between Australia’s Invasive Animals Cooperative Research Centre, University of New England, and Pennsylvania State University, VRAN was established in 2014 to promote community-led action for sustainable and effective rabbit management in Victoria, Australia. In this talk, Reid and Alter describe the management of rabbits in Victoria, southeastern Australia. The speakers share how VRAN built relationships among landowners, land managers, community groups, scientists, and government agencies, and share key principles that have guided their work.

“Reframing rabbit management as a wicked problem was a really important theory of change… it provides space to work differently and be more innovative in thinking about different ways for solving the issues.”


Michael Kern Webinar Issue Briefs

The Water for Agriculture Webinar Series welcomed Professor Michael Kern as its first guest to share an on-the-ground example of diverse interests engaging in collaborative natural resource  governance in Washington State from his work as director of the William D. Ruckelshaus Center.

He began by defining “collaborative governance”, describing it as an “umbrella term that refers to a wide range of public policy processes” that all share the goal of “reaching beyond traditional boundaries in public policy.” Professor Kern laid out the following criteria for the type of collaborative governance he practices: “that it’s a facilitated or mediated, multi-party, consensus seeking process, intended to resolve a specific or particular public policy challenge.”

You can read the summary of his discussion by clicking on the link above or view a recorded version of this webinar here.   

Jackson-Smith Webinar Issue Brief

Dr. Douglas Jackson-Smith recently joined us for our Water for  Agriculture Webinar Series to share lessons he has learned while involved in participatory water quality research projects throughout his career. His talk outlined types of participation in agricultural research. On one end of the spectrum is conventional on-farm research, during which scientists make decisions without any organized participation from farmers. Moving towards increased participation, consultative research includes input from farmers, but the scientists maintain authority on research decisions. Dr. Jackson-Smith explained that collaborative research is interested in “bringing people inside the research box” to engage farmers, landowners, and other stakeholders in the design, implementation, and co-production of knowledge throughout the research project. The combination of lay knowledge and scientific knowledge can lead to improved science and increased chances of the science leading to action outside of academic institutions.